When Charles Dobie began Selous Safari Company, he wanted to not only go into virgin, remote, stunning locations and open them up to new eyes but he also wanted strived to encourage "good tourism" - tourism which not only partnered conservation but also strived to be ecologically friendly, to ensure our footprint on the ground was negligible.  Our camps have been built with these things in mind and are sympathetic to the environment we have the privilege to inhabit.

In our camps we filter our own water, rather than importing vast amounts of plastic bottles; we use solar power to heat our water and provide electricity; we protect the environments we are in, whether that is Ras Kutani's coastal forest or supporting anti-poaching in our parks; we hire and buy as locally as possible and we are always on the look out for more environmentally friendly initiatives to better our product.  For all our sustainable initiatives please look at our Charities & Conservation page. 

Our efforts have been rewarded recently with our camps being one of the first to be certified by theResponsible Tourism Tanzania association, which offers voluntary membership to those who believe in a sustainable approach to tourism in Tanzania.  We are absolutely delighted to be recognised for our work in this area and we promise to continually improve our sustainable policies.  Our guests can travel with us knowing that not only are they receiving the best standard of service and experiences but also they are not impacting on these wonderful landscapes.

latest posts
The 'East African Campaign', often wrongly romanticised as an adventurous and somewhat unimportant side-show to the First World War, came to an end 100 years ago today (November 25th1918) when German General Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck and his troops formally surrendered. 
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It started with a rude awakening at 5:20 Monday morning when a cacophony of bush-noises alerted us to the unfolding drama in front of the Siwandu management house.
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"A breath of wind catches in the sail, the creaking of ropes and fluttering of cloth before the fabric fills with tension, and billows to the shape of a perfect crescent-moon that fills the sky...As the dhow cuts through the crystal waters it seems as eager to reach Fanjove Island as we are." Laura Thubron, Manager of Fanjove Private Island, gives a taste of what makes Fanjove so special.
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